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Monday, September 10, 2012

Monday Discussion: Things You Wish You Liked More

Last week I posted here about how I wished I sought out more poetry. I like poetry, I just forget to seek it out, and since it is not shelved in my collection area, I need to work harder to simply remember it.

But then I got to thinking about genres and authors I should like in theory, but when I actually read them, I just don't.

Here are some examples.

China Mieville is an author I should love.  His books are genre benders that mix fantasy and science fiction.  They are intricately plotted, with awesome world-building and lots of social commentary.  But every time I read one, I am disappointed. Usually it is the characters and the endings that let me down.  I really want to like Mieville, but it just never comes together for me.

I also do not like Mysteries as much as I think I should.  I have a few series I like a lot, but I like those because of the characters or the setting.  In general, I am always annoyed at how neatly mysteries end.  The bad guy is caught and the good guys prevail.  Mystery has none of the anxiety and uncertainty I love in horror and psychological suspense.

Here is an example of these mixed feelings from when I read Jo Nesbo's The Snowman.  I loved the book until the movie-like ending.  It wrapped up too neatly for me. But even though I know that Mysteries always end happily resolved without any ambiguity, I keep trying to find one I will love without reservation.

What about you?  For today's Monday Discussion, share an author, genre, or format you wish you liked more.

For past Monday Discussions, click here.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I should like fantasy more. I've tried reading Tolkien, but something is missing for me. Maybe I will try again this winter with a great epic book.:)

Katy said...

I feel exactly the same way about China Mieville. I SHOULD like his books, but I just...don't.

Christi said...

I wish I liked audiobooks more. Now that I have an actual commute to work, I'm starting to enjoy them, but I find often that my mind starts wandering and that I feel confused about what I'm supposed to be doing with my eyes and hands while I'm listening.

I wish I liked horror at all :). I feel like I'm missing out on a whole genre, but since I don't particularly like being scared, I have realized it's just not for me.

John, Librarian At Dawn said...

This is a very long list for me, unfortunately.

1. Twilight (the whole series). I like books about vampires. I love books about high school. I just can't stomach these books even for a few chapters.

2. Neil Gaiman. I loved his comic book work. As an author of novels he just can't keep my interest.

3. Stephen King. I loved his books when I was in Jr. High. Then I realized I was reading the same story over and over. He just changes the monsters.

4. The English Patient. People raved that this was the best book ever. It wasn't. Now it's forgotten.

5. The Da Vinci Code. Same as 4.

6. James Patterson. I like scary stories, mysteries and thrillers. His book are none of these but claim to be all of these.

7. C.S. Lewis. His writing was ruined for me when I learned more about him as a person.

8. China Mieville. Same as 7.

9. Ezra Pound. Same as 7.

10. Piers Anthony. It's like a bad episode of Sesame Street.

11. L.A. Banks. Zane, the vampire years.

12. Patricia Cornwell. Just make it go away.

Betty said...

Pop fiction (mostly) -- when someone comes into the library saying she/he can't put the latest James Patterson book down, I have a hard time staying noncommittal. Sorry, books of that genre just leave me cold. Same thing for cozy mysteries.